A Family Grew 7000 Pounds of Organic Food Per Year on 1/10th of an Acre by Permaculture

A family grew 7000 Pounds of Organic Food Per Year

A family was able to grow over 7000 pounds of purely organic food on 1/10th of an acre in just one year – the output was able to cater the family’s diet by ninety percent. They were able to sell the extra produce for over 20 grands while they spent only $2 per day on each person on kitchen staples. This record-breaking organic production is setting an example around the world.

The family is located only at a 15 minutes’ drive from Los Angeles Downtown. This agricultural paradise was made on just a vacant lot in the city.  

What makes their organic produce so abundant? It’s the amazing permaculture method of growing agricultural garden with a natural process of creating a soil rich in friendly bacteria and nutrients.

The main difference between permaculture and other landscaping methods is that it is not just a set of practical methods, it is a way of thinking and adapting to a certain ecology. Each garden, each family, and each community is different – so permaculture is based on observation and local knowledge.

Permaculture is a system of principles of social and agricultural design whose work philosophy is to work for nature. To do this, it is based on its observation and uses systemic thinking, i.e.  it treats the different elements that make up the system as part of a whole.

The permaculture design system achieves the integration of the landscape with the people who inhabit it by providing them with their materials and non-materials in a sustainable way. Permaculture covers many aspects as it includes techniques of ecological design, ecological engineering, environmental design, management and creation of aquatic resources, sustainable architecture, the design of agricultural systems and conservation and self-maintained habitats modeled from natural ecosystems. The philosophy of permaculture incorporates ideas and practices of all time. It makes use of these systems and incorporates them into a broader framework to create sustainable human ecosystems.

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