The Reality Of The Modern Immune System

So first of all, what we need to understand is that the immune system that is taught to the MDs or the pediatricians is literally about a hundred plus years old, or that’s on bad day. On a good day, it’s probably around 60 years old. What I’m talking about is that the theory of the immune system that’s used dates back to 1915 that you’re looking at about a hundred plus years old or if you want to give them a little bit better about a hundred years old, which is about 60 plus years.

Sorry, 70 years now, right? Let’s put 70 years. Okay, so that’s what we’re talking about. Um, so what, so before we go into really talking about what is the really the modern immune system look like, let’s really, um, educate you on what the concept of the immune system best that a hundred to 70 years old that’s being used today.

So you understand sort of the backward science that’s being used to look at things like vaccine intervention as he, as the way to build immunity in your body. So that concept of the immune system really involves a, what I’d like to, I’m going to draw it here. Two boxes. The first box that we look at here is called the innate, and I want to think you’re zooming in on this, right? I want to thank Alan Erickson. Allen’s an awesome guy to work with. Um, so the innate immune system is one of the boxes. And over here I’m going to draw what’s called the other box. And let’s call this the adaptive system or the adaptive system.

You have two systems, ENH system and the adaptive system. So the typical medical student, the pediatrician, uh, healthcare professionals today, uh, on a good day are trained these as the two components, the two interacting components of what we call the immune system. And in this concept of the immune system, um, what happens is let’s say you get a virus coming in. This is your virus coming in. And by the way, these are within your body. When the virus comes in, it typically in the natural model comes into your innate immune system. And then your body will generate things to, uh, what I call infantry, or let’s call it a series of nonspecific agents to attack it. Nonspecific agents and these agents are things like macrophages, okay?

Neutrophils, dendritic cells. These are essentially a, if you want to think about it, the war analogy, these are essentially essentially a whole set of artillery that’s used to go attack that virus. The key thing is this, uh, artillery or these set of weaponry or nonspecific, which means it’s basically a bunch of soldiers you throw up there and they just start shooting at everything. Whether this virus is a measles virus or any type of pathogen bacteria, they just start starting to shoot it everything. It’s called the innate system because this is where it first comes into your body. And what I mean by that is your eyes, your nose, your throat, uh, your mucus system and your gut, um, your respiratory system, your skin. So this is where the virus first hits in the natural mode. And in this process, the body tries to attack it using this thing called, uh, the innate or nonspecific immune system. The timeline on this is around zero to around 72 hours. Okay? So it’s very quick. It’s nonspecific. It tries to knock these out. The second process that occurs is that this system initiate the adaptive system and the adaptive system is really composed of two subsystems.

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